Rapina. Predator, the 2012 film Prometheus and the 2017 film Alien: Covenant through his production company Brandywine Productions.He also served as executive producer on the 1986 film Aliens. Probably Hill's most popular film as director, The Warriors finds the titular gang framed for a murder and having to fight their way home. But his particular brand of muscly, masculine, often taciturn action languished for a long while in the action genre ghetto as regards critical appreciation: his films were often lauded for the stylishness, their slick amorality, the relentless thrum of their spartan, tense, thriller-ish elements, but were seldom treated as anything more than disposable by the critical establishment—until recently. A 50-year filmmaking veteran with a career that dates back to ’60s TV, Walter Hill has had a lasting influence on the world of film and TV. This approach is certainly seen in Hill’s pure, minimalist and well-regarded crime thriller “The Driver,” but the technique is also evinced in his lesser seen debut “Hard Times.” Starring Charles Bronson in his pre “Death Wish” fame days (though “Death Wish” came out the year before, the sequels really cemented teh popularity of the franchise) the movie is set in the Great Depression and centers on a mysterious, aging bare knuckle brawler (Bronson) who engages in illegal street fights to eat and pay the rent. The time is 1897 and the territory is the west. A Box Office countdown to Walter Hill's most popular films. Set in an ostensibly present-day New York that’s closer to a post-apocalyptic wasteland than the Big Apple, the film follows the titular gang—including Michael Beck‘s Swan, James Remar‘s Ajax, Terry Michos‘ Vermin, Marcelino Sanchez‘s Rembrandt and David Harris‘ Cochise—who are called to a meeting of all the New York gangs in Van Cortland’s Park, proposing a truce, only for their leader Cyrus (Roger Hill) to be framed for the murder of the leader of the Gramercy Riffs. Walter Hill developed his craft as a screenwriter and director while working as a second assistant director onBullitt, Take the Money and Run, and The Thomas Crown Affair.Hill's first screenplay, Hickey and Boggs, was produced in 1972.Later, he penned The Getaway for director Sam Peckinpah, who became a major influence on his own filmmaking style. The performances are great and it takes a complex view of the main characters. The son of a riveter who worked in shipbuilding, Hill was born in Long Beach, CA, on January 10, 1942. Related: How H.R. Established in the early 1970s as a writer of action movies (earlier he had ambitions to illustrate comic books), Walter Hill went almost unnoticed for … Walter Hill schrieb aber nicht nur für viele seiner Filme die Drehbücher, zusammen mit seinem Partner David Giler produzierte er mit der Alien-Reihe einen Meilenstein der Filmgeschichte, Alien (1979) sowie dessen Fortsetzungen Aliens – Die Rückkehr, Alien³, Alien – Die Wiedergeburt und Alien vs. “The Warriors” (1979) Hill is known for male-dominated action films and revival of the Western. Il cinema di genere del regista Walter Hill percorre parallelamente i binari del western e dell'action movie underground, con una perfetta contaminazione degli stili che l'ha resto un … Western biopic Geronimo features a fantastic cast - Wes Studi, Gene Hackman, Matt Damon - and is directed with class, but it also feels like a big budget TV movie. Hill began his career as a screenwriter on projects like Steve McQueen's The Getaway. Getty/Paramount. Real life brothers James and Stacy Keach play Jesse and Frank James, David, Keith and Robert Carradine play the Younger brothers, Dennis and Randy Quaid are the outlaw Miller siblings and Christopher and Nicolas Guest take on the roles of Robert and Charley Ford. Copyright © 2020 Penske Business Media, LLC. After “Southern Comfort,” Hill had the first major hit of his career with “48 Hrs,” the Eddie Murphy/Nick Nolte action-comedy, which bought him a fair amount of latitude in terms of what to make next. Hill began his career as a screenwriter on projects like Steve McQueen's The Getaway.After launching his directing career in 1975 he quickly established his own style; terse dialogue, brutal action scenes, and non-flashy camerawork. . Edgar Wright: I first saw Walter Hill’s second film, The Driver, as a teenager, late at night on the BBC, quite possibly sitting too close to the telly. This is where the picture gets downright malicious. Posted on August 14, 2017 August 14, 2017 by Tom Lorenzo. Giger's Disturbing Alien Concept Art Changed The Movie. If “48 Hours” had lasting value, little of it is held within mostly now-very-familiar odd couple dynamics that’s a lot less funny than we remembered. Walter Hill Biography: An assistant director in the late '60s, Hill worked on the scripts of several films in the early '70s, including Sam Peckinpah's The Getaway and John Huston's The Mackintosh Man. The Getaway (1994). If anything, Hill’s movie is memorable perhaps for just how unapologetic and brutal it is (Nolte’s character by and large is an unrepentant scumbag). Edgar Wright: I first saw Walter Hill’s second film, The Driver, as a teenager, late at night on the BBC, quite possibly sitting too close to the telly. 7. A one-stop shop for all things video games. When they go to retrieve it, however, they accidentally witness an execution by a gang led by King James (Ice-T) and his number two, Savon (Ice Cube), who try to off them before going for the gold themselves. Learn more The son of a riveter who worked in shipbuilding, Hill was born in Long Beach, CA, on January 10, 1942. 33 Great 70s Films That Time Forgot. Honorable Mentions: While they don’t have the stripped-down action purity of his very best work, “Extreme Prejudice” and “Johnny Handsome” all have worthwhile elements to them, and his westerns, in “Geronimo: An American Legend” and “Wild Bill” are also admirable in places. Posted on August 14, 2017 August 14, 2017 by Tom Lorenzo. Alongside Brewster's Millions, Crossroads is one of the odd men out of Hill's filmography, being a coming of age story centered around blues music. New content will be added above the current area of focus upon selection Screenplay by Walter Hill – Read the treatment! In order to achieve this goal and avenge the death of his murdered partner, this grizzled, surly, unsympathetic cop (Nick Nolte as boozer, womanizer and bigot), breaks all the rules and springs another crook (Eddie Murphy) out of jail to help assist him track down the criminal. The film follows an unnamed cop chasing an unnamed getaway driver, and the film is a stylish, pulpy delight with excellent car chases.